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> Fallout: Florida - The Guide, The Sunshine State's Post-Apocalyptic Wastes
RaderOfTheLostArk
post Yesterday, 02:33 PM
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From: Lilmoth, Black Marsh



Well, I never thought I'd be posting in this particular subforum before now. But with all these ideas bouncing in my head of what post-Great War Florida would look like in the Fallout universe, I have taken to jotting them down and (hopefully) making a cohesive guide to it. I don't really write fiction, so I don't think I'll be writing actual stories like you all do, but I suppose we'll see. For the time being, it's really going to be a guide of sorts, somewhat like a wiki or what textbooks would say.

This will obviously attempt to adhere to Fallout canon as much as possible. I chose Florida as the setting not only because it is my home state (though that is definitely the biggest reason) but because, from what I can tell, so little about the Southeastern United States is talked about in Fallout lore, giving me a lot more room to operate in. And, of course, it's the state I know best and would love to see the most as a setting for a Fallout game.

So here's the plan for all this:
[*] I'm going to break up each section of the guide into its own post to separate it sufficiently. This one will be the introduction to the setting.
[*] I may include some incomplete information on here for several reasons. For one, it'll be an easy repository to refer to just in case the Word doc I am using has something go screwy or that my computer messes up or whatever. Two, it can be a little taste of what's to come. Three, I just want to get down as much content as comes to me.
[*] The tentative list of sections to have here include, but are not limited to (and not necessarily in this order):

[*] General overview of the setting and how I am breaking up the parts of Florida
[*] The Bestiary
[*] The Timeline
[*] The Factions
[*] Profiles of each of the regions I am making


Some of the stuff you see will definitely be subject to change if needed to make it cohesive. I'll try to document what I change to make it clear.

And most of all, I hope you all like it and I'd like to hear whatever feedback you have. Presenting and communicating information is one of the things I enjoy most, although I'm more used to doing so for real-life content (particularly political science).

First section of the guide coming up!

The Setting - Basic Overview


While not experiencing the same level of nuclear barrage as places such as Southern California, New York, and D.C., Florida was plunged into nuclear fire just like virtually everywhere else in the world. This was especially true of the Tampa Bay Area, Orlando and its surrounding areas, and South Florida, centers of great economic and political importance in Pre-War America. Being the 3rd-most populous state in the country, the Great War extinguished far more lives than average here and left plenty more to pick up the pieces in the post-apocalyptic, anarchic wastes. The exceptional biological, geographical, and human diversity of Florida led to a far more varied impact on the former Sunshine State when the bombs fell.

Nevertheless, many settlements started to crop up in the decades just after the Great War, even in those once-densely populated cities and metropolitan areas. In time, former towns and cities were beginning to be resurrected and reclaiming their old names, and brand-new ones started to form. But post-War Florida--and the rest of what used to be the country's Gulf Commonwealth, Louisiana, Alabama, and Mississippi--was still highly fractured. In the 22nd century, the first of many ambitious attempts was made to reunite this once-thriving landscape. While extraordinarily difficult at first, a string of successes in reunification gave birth to the Gulf Coast Union, a nation similar in concept to the future New California Republic (NCR). The so-called Great Reunification--a somewhat hyperbolic title, at least currently--started extending through Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, and even some of southwestern Georgia, though it has yet to reclaim the whole of any of these former states.

The process is far from completed, however, and many other factions both big and small struggle with the Gulf Coast Union for dominance in the former Southeastern United States. Many of the conflicts take place in what used to be the Sunshine State. The Gulf Coast Union was successful in claiming virtually all of Northern Florida and has made inroads into the Central Florida wastes. Major and minor powers violently feuding with each other and with the Gulf Coast Union have made the GCU's grip on these lands somewhat tenuous, preventing any attempts at expanding into South Florida.

As of this guide, it is currently the year 2130, over a half-century since the world was irrevocably changed. To most easily understand the lands that were once called Florida, it is best to divide the area into ten distinct regions--even if the divisions are a bit crude, arbitrary, or too convenient. Each have their own set of conflicts being waged, major and minor players vying for power, and civilizations trying to carve out a life in these harsh wastes. Welcome to the Sunshine State's post-apocalyptic wastes.




Though these broken-up zones are somewhat crude and arbitrary, it'll be easiest to understand post-apocalyptic Florida this way. However, major conflicts in one region can definitely spill over into another.

1) Panhandle West (13): Escambia, Santa Rosa, Okaloosa, Walton, Holmes, Washington, Bay, Jackson, Calhoun, Gulf, Liberty, Franklin, Gadsden
2) Big Bend [also known as Panhandle East] (8): Leon, Wakulla, Jefferson, Madison, Taylor, Lafayette, Dixie, Levy
3) North Central Florida (8): Hamilton, Suwannee, Columbia, Baker, Union, Bradford, Alachua, Gilchrist
4) The First Coast (6): Nassau, Duval, Clay, St. Johns, Putnam, Flagler
5) The Space and Treasure Coasts (7): Volusia, Seminole, Brevard, Indian River, St. Lucie, Martin, Okeechobee
6) Central Florida (8): Marion, Sumter, Lake, Orange, Polk, Osceola, Hardee, Highlands
7) The Tampa Bay Area (6): Citrus, Hernando, Pasco, Pinellas, Hillsborough, Manatee
8) The Gold Coast (3): Palm Beach, Broward, Miami-Dade
9) Southwest Florida (7.5): Sarasota, De Soto, Charlotte, Glades, Lee, Hendry, Collier, Monroe (mainland only)
10) The Keys (0.5): Monroe (Keys only)


Just a quick side-note: The Panhandle West/East dichotomy is one I totally made up for my own purposes. They are, as far as I know, not referred to as such in real life. It is just the Panhandle, and the real-world Panhandle doesn't necessarily include all of the counties in Big Bend.

This post has been edited by RaderOfTheLostArk: Yesterday, 03:12 PM


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"They asked me how well I understood theoretical physics. I said I had a theoretical degree in physics. They said welcome aboard." - Fantastic, Fallout: New Vegas
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Renee
post Yesterday, 04:14 PM
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You are right about the Fallout series not having much to say about southeastern United States. As can be seen in this map, Florida hasn't got any vaults or towns or settlements mentioned at all. But that's just because none of the devs have gotten around to adding these areas into lore. Certainly, Florida would have its own Fallout locations going on.

I'd really hate to see mutant alligators. indifferent.gif Mutant manatees. ohmy.gif

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SubRosa
post Yesterday, 06:48 PM
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Neat! I love to see good brainstorming at work.

I imagine there would be mutant anacondas in the Glades. Or maybe a mutant serpent-man race (Nagas?)



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RaderOfTheLostArk
post Yesterday, 07:36 PM
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From: Lilmoth, Black Marsh



QUOTE(Renee @ Jun 4 2020, 11:14 AM) *

You are right about the Fallout series not having much to say about southeastern United States. As can be seen in this map, Florida hasn't got any vaults or towns or settlements mentioned at all. But that's just because none of the devs have gotten around to adding these areas into lore. Certainly, Florida would have its own Fallout locations going on.

I'd really hate to see mutant alligators. indifferent.gif Mutant manatees. ohmy.gif


Right. Although there was a canceled game, Fallout: Tactics 2, that was to be set in Florida. I will be incorporating a few bits of what little we know about that game's premise.

Not sure what I'm going to do with manatees, but wait until you see what I've got cooked up for mutant gators and crocodiles. biggrin.gif Oh, if only I could draw, especially concept art.


QUOTE(SubRosa @ Jun 4 2020, 01:48 PM) *

Neat! I love to see good brainstorming at work.

I imagine there would be mutant anacondas in the Glades. Or maybe a mutant serpent-man race (Nagas?)


Oooh, Anacondas are a good idea. I have a name for a creature called a Gladewalker, but no idea for what it will be beyond that. Maybe that's what I'll make it...


And speaking of: The (work-in-progress) bestiary is next!



The Bestiary


The Great War was deadly for species of animals and plants across the whole world, especially so for the exceptional ecological diversity of former Florida. Still, many species made it through one of the darkest days in history, even thriving afterwards. But almost all of them were changed significantly due to the high levels of radiation, with all sorts of different mutations.
  1. Swamp Demons (Super Gators) and Rad Gators: Already a deadly predator, alligators saw major changes in their biology, but it was not uniform across the board. Some were changed so greatly that they became larger, had heightened regenerative abilities, acquired even longer lifespans than usual, and became bipedal. These alligators started to become known as "Swamp Demons" or "Super Gators." Some even exhibited a higher level of intelligence due to Enclave and U.S. Government experiments and the compounding fallout from the Great War. Swamp Demons (one of the two versions of the "Floridian Deathclaw" also gained more resistance to damage, particularly in their head, meaning headshots from weapons are not necessarily effective at bringing them down. Yet for reasons unknown, some gators continued to be four-legged creatures, though they still gained some resistance to damage along with regenerative abilities. These gators are simply known as "Rad Gators."
  2. Longsnouts and Rad Crocs: Similarly to alligators, crocodiles also diverged into bipedal creatures and those that still stayed low to the ground on four legs. The former came to be known as "Longsnouts," referring to their longer, narrower jawlines and snouts compared to their gator cousins. This mutation only elongated said jawlines and snouts, heightening their sense of smell compared to mutated gators yet making them more vulnerable to damage to the head. For reasons unknown, they also did not gain quite the regenerative abilities and intelligence that Swamp Demons did, though crocodiles were also experimented on comparatively less by the Enclave and the U.S. Government. Crocodiles that stay four-legged are simply known as "Rad Crocs." Longsnouts are the other type of "Floridian Deathclaw."
  3. Radfrogs: Plenty of species of frogs called Florida their home in Pre-War times, and while many species were wiped out by the bombs, many others survived and continue to populate the Sunshine Wastes. Curiously, not all frogs have become hostile creatures, but those that are are a force to be reckoned with. One of the defining differences between frogs and toads is that the former have moist skin, and mutations have given Radfrogs the ability to secrete and spray radioactive liquid onto their foes. They can also use their tongues as a weapon. Their skin gives them higher resistance to radiation and energy damage...but makes them more susceptible to regular ballistic damage.
  4. Radtoads: One of the defining differences between frogs and toads is that the former have moist, softer skin while the latter have tough, dry skin. This was also reflected in the difference in mutations. Radtoads tough, dry skin helps them run into enemies and cause bleeding damage due to how rough and jagged pockets of skin can be. They can use their tongue as a weapon as well, just like the Radfrog. The tough skin makes them more resistant to regular ballistics damage...though they have a weaker tolerance for energy damage. [NOTE: Radtoads also appear in Fallout 76, though while they have many eyes in that game the Floridian version still maintains the normal 2 eyes.]
  5. Pouncers: In the real world, the Florida Panther is a heavily endangered species, with less than 150 left that are still alive. In the Fallout world, they were still endangered in the lead-up to the Great War, but less so than in our world. Many would survive that dark day, becoming what are referred to as "Pouncers." The radiation damaged their mental faculties to make them far more aggressive than pre-Great War. Their signature hooked-tail became a powerful tool in the Pouncer's arsenal, which it often uses to stun its prey before sinking its teeth or its lengthened claws into such organisms unfortunate enough to cross paths with it.
  6. Armadillos: While many creatures came to be (more) aggressive due to the radiation, the armadillo was an exception. Although becoming larger and gaining a tougher shell, armadillos are docile and friendly toward Sunshine Wastelanders. Some have even been tamed by wastelanders and used as pets.
  7. Mirelurks: Florida's Mirelurks are much like their Commonwealth and Capitol Wasteland counterparts, though the have some aesthetic differences due to being different species of crabs that live in the Sunshine Wasteland.
  8. Brahmin: Brahmin in Florida mutated more or less the same way as Brahmin from other parts of the United States.
  9. Anoles: These once-tiny lizards have grown exponentially compared to the original size, though the biggest ones aren't much bigger than a mole rat. They are also generally friendly toward humans, and have become pets for some Sunshine Wastelanders.
  10. Great Blue Herons: The Great Blue Heron just got even bigger in the Post-War wastes, growing up to 8 feet tall with a wingspan up to 10 feet long. They still generally mind their own business, though Sunshine Wastelanders should still take care not to feed them. Great Blue Herons have been known to get very upset and attack Sunshine Wastelanders when the latter feeds them but then stops doing so.
  11. Cicadas/Sirens: Fallout from the Great War has increased the size of creatures to about half that of an average human male. Known for their loud calls during the daytime, mutations have made them capable of emitting even louder sounds than before the Great War, giving them the nickname of "Sirens." Typically, these are only used when they perceive a threat. There doesn't seem to be much of a rhyme or reason to whether they are hostile or friendly. Some nests have been indifferent to or afraid of humans, while others are much quicker to provoke.
  12. Nutria: These semiaquatic rodents are similar to the Mole Rats that can be found in places such as Mojave Wasteland, the Commonwealth, and the Capitol Wasteland, and act in similar ways. Nutria, however, are found in more aquatic environments such as marshes and tend to be a bit more dangerous than mole rats.
  13. Rad Boas: Already a potentially dangerous creature to tangle with in the wild in Pre-War times, boa constrictors have gained more of a penchant for trying to wrap around its prey and squeeze tightly. Yet just as in Pre-War times, these snakes can be tamed, though it is tougher to do in the Sunshine Wasteland.
  14. Otters: These friendly fellows still manage to be mostly friendly even as their mental and physical faculties have been wracked by radiation, though one can find the occasional aggressive one.
  15. Flamingos: These birds didn't change all that much despite surviving the Great War. However, they rarely sport the pink feathers they were once known for, and one can see patches of exposed skin where feathers once were.
  16. Giant Iguanas: Green Iguanas were an invasive Pre-War species that first appeared in South Florida in the mid-20th century. Their enlarged Post-War iterations aren't necessarily friendly or hostile but are still invasive, and still destroying property and general infrastructure. Despite not generally physically threatening Sunshine Wastelanders, one ought to care to set up settlements or camps with these creatures nearby, as what you build may very well be tramped by this nuisance.
  17. Kolossus (Monitor Lizards): Cousins of the Komodo Dragon, Monitor Lizards garnered the nickname "Kolossi" (singular: Kolossus) for their immense frame and greater mass and weight than other creatures about their size, both results of nuclear fallout. Some Sunshine Wastelanders have somehow found ways to tame these creatures, though it is extremely rare. Still, they usually stay away from humans and are generally not quick to provocation with them, though curiously they are aggressive towards many other mutated creatures.
  18. Manatees: While a legally-protected animal in Pre-War times, no such protection is possible in these post-apocalyptic wastes. They simply traded the threat of boating accidents, etc. for threats from mutated creatures, particularly Mirelurks. They still retain a friendly but skittish disposition toward humans, along with a faint green ting to their body.
  19. Key Deer: This species of deer acquired a sickly green coat, extended antlers (for those that would have them), and yellowed eyes, though they are still skittish and docile.
  20. Spore Plants: Animals weren't the only organisms to suffer from the fallout of the Great War. This type of plant became capable of attacking humans and other creatures. Virtually any organisms that cross paths with a Spore Plant will be attacked by one--even giant creatures like Swamp Demons or Longsnouts. Spore Plants have the ability to spit poison projectiles. [NOTE: Spore Plants appeared in Fallout 2, which this version is more-or-less based on.]
  21. La Boca del Lago ("Mouth of the Lake"): Reports have surfaced of a strange, mysterious, and terrifying creature that lurks in the depths of Lake Okeechobee, but they conflict on what exactly the creature is. Some reports have suggested it is a giant, mutated fish, others saying it is a scaled creature, and still others that report it simply having regular skin. There isn't even agreement on whether it is one creature or several. Whatever it is, the reports generally agree on two things: That the creature is enormous and very deadly. Several destroyed settlements on the banks of Lake Okeechobee are said to be the work of this monster.
  22. Gladewalkers: Gladewalkers are perhaps the most dangerous creatures in all of the Sunshine Wastes, an impressive feat considering they have competition from other menaces such as Swamp Demons. Few human beings have seen these creatures (or at least who lived to tell the tale), but their reports are all generally similar: Some abominable, abhorrent mixture of creatures that should not exist. Due to few reported sightings and these sightings' limited geographical spread, many Sunshine Wastelanders who have never encountered a Gladewalker might be justified in thinking them to only be a myth--even in a Wasteland that is particularly filled with a wide variety of diabolical monstrosities. Unfortunately for them, Gladewalkers are quite real. Due to some unknown property in the Everglades' water, along with toxic waste, possible Enclave experiments, and fallout from the Great War, parts of the Everglades became a melting pot for walking horrors. The Gladewalker is one such beast, a combination of toadfish, anaconda, alligator, bat, and snapping turtle borne out of noxious marshes.
More creatures coming soon, including some urban legends...

This post has been edited by RaderOfTheLostArk: Yesterday, 11:42 PM


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"Be resolute, fear no sacrifice, and surmount every difficulty to win victory." - Frandar Hunding, The Elder Scrolls

"They asked me how well I understood theoretical physics. I said I had a theoretical degree in physics. They said welcome aboard." - Fantastic, Fallout: New Vegas
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